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Meg's Blog

Psych Major Syndrome

Booksellers love it.

Book bloggers are giving away signed copies in their excitement over it.

Even YA librarians can’t wait to get their hands on a copy.

And lucky me…I’ve already read it!


Take a look at this gorgeous cover!

I have to admit, I’m a reluctant reader. And I’ve only gotten pickier lately.

But Psych Major Syndrome lured me in with its smart writing and by the fact that the heroine is in college. I loved that she has to mentor a problem teen who is always dissing her, and has a quirky roommate, frenemies, and a boyfriend who won’t sleep with her.

And the boyfriend has a roommate. Note the emphasis.

Plus the fact that she’s a psych major means, naturally, that she’s always analyzing herself and everybody else for neuroses.

Plus the book deals with sexual issues in a manner that gets the heroine, as a teen mentor, in trouble from time to time, and should get this book banned in a few schools for sure. YAY For Alicia Thompson!

Did I leave out the fact that the boyfriend’s roommate is often around….

…shirtless?

From Publishers Weekly:

Psychology major Leigh Nolan wants to devote her life to analyzing people, but in her first year at a small, highly liberal college, she has her hands full trying to decipher the meaning behind her own idiosyncrasies. Why is she so reluctant to buy a parking sticker when the tickets she has accumulated will cost far more than a decal? Why can’t she pinpoint a happy moment that she’s experienced? Why hasn’t she had sex with the boy she’s been dating for over a year? In a romantic comedy that at the same time deals frankly with sexual issues, first-time author Thompson pokes fun at academia as she explores Leigh’s muddled feelings about her boyfriend and his good-looking roommate, Nathan. Ironies abound in this novel, and the supporting cast of offbeat characters—Leigh’s unconventional parents (“My mom teaches shamanistic dance at the local Y, and my dad takes a weeklong vow of silence every year. Their view of ‘normal’ is a little skewed”); her arty roommate, Ami; and Rebekah, the smart-alecky, all-too-worldly middle schooler Leigh mentors—add depth. Ages 12–up. (Aug.)

This was one scorching hot read that once I got into, I couldn’t put down, because I was all, “Are she and the roommate’s boyfriend going to DO IT? Because that’s going to be messy and wrong, so very, very wrong, and yet so very, very right….”

Yeah. You want to read this book.

Here is the author’s blog and here’s an interesting interview with the author over at Ypulse.

Recommended for reading while in a hammock, at the beach, in the tub, on a plane, or just about anywhere.

More later.

Much love,

Meg

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