Avalon High Disney Channel Movie Premiere

November 12th, 2010

It’s finally here! Premiere night for the movie based on my book, Avalon High!

And the best part is, this isn’t some snobby premiere out in Hollywood that only the stars are invited to . . . it’s a premiere we can ALL go to, right in our living rooms!

Because it’s on Disney Channel, which we all get (well, unless you don’t have cable or you live in some country that doesn’t have Disney Channel, in which case, I’m sorry! But I’m sure the movie will come out soon where you live)!

So let’s get together for our premiere party on Twitter! I’ll be live-Tweeting my thoughts on the movie (No! I’ve never seen it!), and you can Tweet back yours (I’ll also be on Facebook!) all night! Join me on Twitter or my Facebook page, or both! Be there at eight sharp! You don’t have to dress up, but do try to have popcorn.

Here is the official movie poster. Isn’t it AMAZING????

I love it!

Now, I know some people have already gotten to see this movie On Demand where they live, and have said it doesn’t quite follow the book. Remember how Anne Hathaway didn’t have blond hair, and there was no Tina or Boris, and Mia’s dad wasn’t dead in the Princess Diaries movie? There are changes like that in the Avalon High movie, as well.

But everyone ended up loving The Princess Diaries movie anyway, because it was like it’s own separate Princess Diaries universe, which was very sweet. I know Avalon High is going to be the same way.

As we know, it’s hard to cram 300 pages into a 70 minute film (that’s one page of book per minute of screen time)! I know about the changes that have been made to this story, and I understand why they did them. To quote Britt Robertson, who plays the movie’s heroine (this is from the Jacksonville Observer) about Avalon High:

“Avalon High” is adapted from Meg Cabot’s (“The Princess Diaries”) book of the same title. “If you read the book, you see she does a brilliant job incorporating lightheartedness with the mystery, combining all these different elements,” says Britt. “The screenplay writer did the same thing. There’s action, comedy, drama, romance and mystery. It’s got a little bit of everything. A few things are different from the books for time’s sake, working within the hour-and-a-half time constraints. But they did a brilliant job of adapting it.”

Not ALL the changes were made for time’s sake. Some were made to draw new, younger viewers into the story more quickly, and to keep them there, which to me is a good thing! Now a story that means a lot to me is going to find a whole new audience that might never otherwise have heard about it . . . something that happened after The Princess Diaries appeared on film.

I can’t tell you how many letter I got after that movie came out that said, “I never read a book before I saw that movie, but I wanted to know more about the story, so I bought the book, and now I can’t stop reading.”

To me that’s the point of having books made into films! One reason I became a reader as a kid was because of a movie: The Fantastic Voyage (about a group of scientists who get shrunk down to microscopic size and injected into a man’s veins to destroy an embolism in his brain using teeny tiny laser guns)!

I went to the library after I saw it on TV and asked, “Are there any books like the movie The Fantastic Voyage?” and the librarian said, “There actually is a book OF that movie. Let me get it for you.”

I was so happy! That movie got to me into reading (and writing) books forever.

If that happens to kids because of MY books (and the movies of them) I’ll feel as if I have reduced the suckage here on earth significantly.

Maybe that is why I was so super excited when I turned on my TV this morning and saw THIS on the guide:

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Yeah, I took a picture of my TV. So what? It says my name on my TV Guide!!!!

I REALLY hope I see you tonight at 8! XXXOOO

More later.

Much love,

Meg